Accessibility and Website Information Skip Site Wide Navigation Skip to Content City Seal | HomeCity of San Diego | Home
Search City of San Diego

Lead Safety and Healthy Homes Program

History

Photo of Paint Cans

The Lead Safety and Healthy Homes Program was formerly known as the Lead Safe Neighborhoods Program, originally created by the San Diego City Council in April 2002 to develop and implement a City-wide lead poisoning prevention program. The Lead Poisoning Prevention Citizen's Advisory Taskforce and the San Diego Regional Lead Working Group were formed to help the Lead Safe Neighborhoods Program reach its goal of making all of San Diego's neighborhoods lead safe. These two groups developed an enforcement policy to address property owners and landlords who maintain lead hazards and contractors who create lead hazards.

  • April 2002 - The San Diego City Council created the Lead Safety and Healthy Homes Program (then known as the Lead Safe Neighborhoods Program) and approved a lead ordinance to help eliminate lead hazards in San Diego housing.

  • September 2002 - The City of San Diego created the Lead Poisoning Prevention Citizen's Advisory Taskforce to develop a comprehensive lead hazard ordinance and provide recommendations for an effective lead safe neighborhoods program.

  • October 2002 - The City of San Diego Environmental Services Department developed lead-related training programs for landlords and contractors to ensure San Diego's housing is free from lead hazards, as well as a lead information phone line, available by calling Environmental Services General Department Information at 858-694-7000.

  • October 2002 - The City of San Diego received a $1.9 million U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development three-year grant, for the control of lead hazards in Council District 8. The grant was administered by the San Diego Housing Commission.

  • FY 2002-2003 - the Lead Safety and Healthy Homes Program received $200,000 in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds for pilot programs in the Linda Vista and Sherman Heights communities to identify and remove lead paint hazards in area homes.

  • September 2003 - The City of San Diego received a two-year, $478,927 grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to perform education and outreach about lead hazards in the older homes of San Diego.

  • October 2003 - The City of San Diego began enforcement of Senate Bill 460, which amended California Health and Safety Code to include the following:
    • Allowed local enforcement agencies to perform enforcement related to lead hazards.
    • Defines housing as substandard when a lead hazard is present (H&SC 17920.10).
    • If contractor disturbs paint on pre-1979 house without containment, the law assumes they have created a lead hazard (H&SC 105256).

  • July 2004 - The City of San Diego received a three-year, $483,129 grant from the California Department of Health Services, Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch to help implement SB 460 in the region and perform lead related enforcement.

  • August 2004 - The Lead Poisoning Prevention and Control Ordinance draft generated by the Lead Poisoning Prevention Citizen's Advisory Taskforce was presented to the City of San Diego Land Use and Housing Council Committee and approved unanimously.

  • September 2005 - The San Diego Housing Commission received a $7 million U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, three-year grant for the control of lead hazards City-wide.

  • FY 2006 - Councilmembers Donna Frye, Brian Maienschein, and Scott Peters allocated $40,000 in CDBG funds to increase community lead awareness and perform lead related enforcement.

  • FY 2008 - Councilmember Peters, Atkins, and Frye allocate $85,000 of Community Development Block Grant funding for lead enforcement.

  • October 2007 - Contract start date for EPA's Targeted Grants to Reduce Childhood Lead Poisoning. This is a two year grant for $99,914 to increase lead awareness and conduct training.

  • November 2007 - Contract start date for HUD's Healthy Homes Demonstration Grant. This is a three year grant for $999,914 to identify environmental problems that could affect a child's health and to perform low-cost corrective action to improve households.

  • January 2008 - Contract start date for EPA's National Community Based Lead Outreach and Training Grant. This is a one year grant for $249,220 to increase lead awareness and conduct training.

  • May 2008 - Lead Hazard Prevention and Control Ordinance becomes effective. This ordinance establishes a comprehensive framework for childhood lead poisoning prevention, affecting property owners, home improvement stores, stores that sell or rent power washing equipment and licensed childcare facilities.

San Diego Healthy Homes Symposium 2009

San Diego County residents were invited to participate in two free workshops at the San Diego Healthy Homes Symposium 2009. Both workshops focused on important healthy housing programs and interventions currently taking place in San Diego County, and how the program fit into the larger state and national picture. This information is still relevant today.

View the PowerPoints presented at the afternoon Legislative Forum on May 28, 2009:

 

Lead Poisoning Prevention Citizen's Advisory Taskforce

The Lead Poisoning Prevention Citizen's Advisory Taskforce (LPPCAT) was started in September 2002 to ensure community and stakeholder input for the Lead Safety and Healthy Homes Program. The taskforce was co-chaired by Councilmember Donna Frye and former Councilmember Ralph Inzunza. The purpose of this committee is to provide consultation and assistance to the City with respect to the development and implementation of the Lead Safety and Healthy Homes Program. In 2004, the LPPCAT presented a municipal ordinance on the elimination of lead hazards within the City of San Diego, which the City's Land Use and Housing Council Committee approved.

San Diego Regional Lead Working Group

In January 2002, the City Agency Lead Working Group (CALWG) was created to consolidate the efforts of local agencies and community-based organizations concerned about lead poisoning prevention. The purpose of the CALWG is to minimize overlap of responsibilities, maximize resources and coordinate grant applications. The name changed in 2005 to the San Diego Regional Lead Working Group and expanded participation to all groups throughout San Diego County interested in the goal of lead poisoning prevention.