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Parks Master Plan logo

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Complete Communities logo

Parks Master Plan logo

City of San Diego logo

Parks Master Plan

Complete Communities: Play Everywhere

Parks Master Plan

Complete Communities: Play Everywhere

Why?

Why?

Shifts in lifestyles, demographics, technology, and patterns of community development have fundamentally reshaped recreation in the City of San Diego. These changes have transformed the way the City prepares for the future of housing, jobs, transportation, and the environment, and the way it plans for meeting recreational needs.

California Tower at Balboa Park
California Tower at Balboa Park

The 2008 General Plan identified the need for a new Parks Master Plan. The Parks Master Plan aligns parks planning with the City of San Diego’s vision to achieve the shared Citywide goals of sustainability and resilience, equity, livability, and connectivity. The development of the Parks Master Plan will help implement the Climate Action Plan by providing a framework for thriving public spaces to be enjoyed by residents and visitors throughout the City.

Parks Master Plan Vision

Parks Master Plan Vision

 
  • Interconnected Citywide park system
  • Provide thriving recreational spaces in areas with easy access to transit
  • New recreational experiences
  • Equitable investments in parks in areas with most need
  • Easy walk, bicycle, and transit access to parks
  • Opportunities for everyone to play outside and make social connections
 

Popup ice skating rink at Liberty Station
Liberty Station - Popup Ice Skating

Mini-park at Tweet Street
Tweet Street Mini Park

Little Italy piazza at night
Little Italy Piazza

Public Outreach

Public Outreach

  • Citywide statistically valid survey
  • 13 workshops + 2 popup community events
  • 2 online activities
  • 7 presentations to advisory bodies

Community members participating in a park planning workshop

What We Learned

  • 67% of residents are satisfied or very satisfied with the City's parks
  • Residents favor upgrades to existing parks
  • Opportunities to add recreational value within existing public spaces
  • Priorities include small neighborhood parks, open space and trails, beaches and shoreline parks, fitness and wellness programs, senior programs, and nature programming

What We Learned

  • 67% of residents are satisfied or very satisfied with the City's parks
  • Residents favor upgrades to existing parks
  • Opportunities to add recreational value within existing public spaces
  • Priorities include small neighborhood parks, open space and trails, beaches and shoreline parks, fitness and wellness programs, senior programs, and nature programming

Satisfaction with Facilities and Programs

Satisfaction with Facilities and Programs

 

Satisfaction with Facilities and Programs67% Very Satisfied and Satisfied, 25% Neutral, 6% Dissatisfied, 2% Very Dissatisfied

Just over two-thirds (67%) of residents were satisfied or very satisfied with the City's Parks and Recreation Facilities/Programs

 

Upgrades to Parks and Park Facilities

Upgrades to Parks and Park Facilities

 

Upgrades to Parks and Park Facilities96% of residents think upgrades to existing public restrooms are important, 94% of residents think upgrades to existing regional parks are important, 95% of residents think upgrades to existing public parks are important, 94% of residents think upgrades to existing beaches and shoreline parks are important, 92% of residents think upgrades to security of parks are important

 

How We Currently Plan

How We Currently Plan

The City currently uses the General Plan acreage-based standard of 2.8 acres per 1,000 population to plan for future parks on a community plan area basis. As the City has developed, this current standard creates some challenges:

  • Limits comprehensive planning for an interconnected Citywide parks system
  • Urbanized areas lack available land
  • Funding and staffing limits
  • Can create further inequities in the distribution of parks throughout the City

Map of existing parks in the City of San Diego
City of San Diego Existing Parks

Parks Master Plan Recommendations

Identifies existing gaps to guide future park development and promotes equity throughout the city.

  • New Equity Goals
  • New 10-20-30-40 Minute Access Goal
  • New Park Standard that measures recreational value
  • Citywide Park Development Impact Fee

Parks Master Plan Recommendations

Identifies existing gaps to guide future park development and promotes equity throughout the city.

  • New Equity Goals
  • New 10-20-30-40 Minute Access Goal
  • New Park Standard that measures recreational value
  • Citywide Park Development Impact Fee

Parks Master Plan Equity Goals

Parks Master Plan Equity Goals

Acknowledges historical inequities in the City’s parks system experienced by people who live in communities of concern and promotes equal access to enjoy the many physical and social benefits of public parks and recreation services. Future park development and funding will be guided by the factors below.

  • Climate Equity Index – Prioritizes investments and funding in communities of concern
  • Park Condition Index – Highlights a parks current condition and maintenance needs
  • Park Pressure – Analyzes local populations and communities to ensure park needs are met

Children skateboarding at Park de la Cruz Skate Park

Children running at a Jog-a-thon

  • Climate Equity Index – Prioritizes investments and funding in communities of concern
  • Park Condition Index – Highlights a parks current condition and maintenance needs
  • Park Pressure – Analyzes local populations and communities to ensure park needs are met

Parks Master Plan Park
10-20-30-40 Minute
Access Goal

Parks Master Plan Park
10-20-30-40 Minute
Access Goal

Sets a travel time goal for reaching a meaningful recreational opportunity and promotes equity across communities to ensure all San Diegans have access to recreation. Also Identifies existing gaps to guide future park development.

  • 10-minute walk
  • 20-minute bike ride or micro-mobility ride
  • 30-minute transit
  • 40-at least 40 minutes enjoyed in the park (park activation)

Bankers Hills Open Space and Spruce Street Suspension Bridge
Bankers Hills Open Space and Spruce Street Suspension Bridge

Walk Access to City of San Diego Existing Parks
Walk Access to City of San Diego Existing Parks

New Recreational Value-Based Park Standard

A new way to plan a meaningful, successful, and interconnected park system that prioritizes a park's overall recreational value.

  • Value Standard – 12 points per 1,000 population
  • Value determined based on features related to carrying capacity, recreation opportunities, access, amenities, and activations

New Recreational Value-Based Park Standard

A new way to plan a meaningful, successful, and interconnected park system that prioritizes a park's overall recreational value.

  • Value Standard – 12 points per 1,000 population
  • Value determined based on features related to carrying capacity, recreation opportunities, access, amenities, and activations

How did we develop the new Park Standard?

How did we develop the new Park Standard?

Park development flowchart

 

How we collect park fees now

How we collect park fees now

Park fee graphic

The City currently sets and collects fees on a community planning area level. A few challenges we face are:

  • Restricts City's ability to deliver parks sooner even when money is otherwise available
  • While parks are to be enjoyed by all residents, the fees collected must be spent within the community it was collected
  • Funds not always spent on parks
  • Fees can greatly vary between communities

Citywide Park Development
Impact Fee

Citywide Park Development Impact Fee

 

Citywide Park Development Impact Fee sets a standard impact fee across the entire city allowing the City to:

  • Deliver parks faster with access to a larger pool of funds
  • Target the greatest needs across the City
  • Efficient use of land to provide more recreational assets at lower cost
 

Grantville Park

Grantville Park after conceptual upgrades

Conceptual before and after images of potential park upgrades on existing City land implemented with a Citywide Park impact fee

Complete Communities:
Play Everywhere

Complete Communities: Play Everywhere

The Parks Master Plan is part of the City of San Diego's Complete Communities initiative. For more information on Complete Communities please visit:

Complete Communities

 

Feedback

Feedback

Please provide feedback on the Draft Parks Master Plan and Draft General Plan Recreation Element Amendment by completing a short survey available by clicking the button below:

Draft Parks Master Plan and Draft General Plan Recreation Element Amendment Survey and Public Input

The Public Comment Period ends June 11, 2020. 

The Planning Department will review all comments received after the end of the formal comment period, and will present all comments received to decision makers.

The draft documents were posted on April 24, 2020 and are available by clicking the button below:

Draft Parks Master Plan & Draft General Plan Recreation Element Amendment

If you have additional questions or feedback after taking the survey, please contact Jonathan Avila at [email protected]

 
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