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SDPL Recommended Books

Staff Picks 2018

San Diego Public Library staff write short book reviews of their favorite titles for the San Diego Union Tribune, which are published every other Sunday. These are a selection of the titles we've recommended. Checkout information may be found in the library catalog under Staff Picks


 
Congratulations, by the Way: Some Thoughts on Kindness - George SaundersReviewed by Linda Lou Brawley
Librarian II, Central Library
San Diego Union-Tribune, June 10, 2018
 
It’s graduation season, and this is the gift that keeps on giving. In 2013, George Saunders delivered a speech at Syracuse University’s convocation that lasted about 10 minutes. Three months later, it went viral after The New York Times posted it on its website. This book reads as if you are having a conversation with the author. With his usual earnest and humorously selfdeprecating delivery, Saunders shares a simple piece of wisdom: throughout your journey, err on the side of kindness. In the long run, it’s failures of kindness that will cause regrets. As for success or accomplishments? The real measure of success is how you get there.

 
Sachiko: A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor’s Story by Caren StelsonReviewed by Erin Moore
Youth Services Librarian, San Carlos Branch Library
San Diego Union-Tribune, May 13, 2018
 
In this powerful biography, we learn the story of Sachiko Yasui, who was 6 when an atomic bomb exploded over Nagasaki, just half a mile from where she was playing house with friends. Sachiko survives the blast — even though her playmates, as well as many loved ones, do not. In the years that follow, Sachiko and her family work to rebuild their lives despite overwhelming loss and destruction. In sharing Sachiko’s experience, author Caren Stelson provides a glimpse into life in the aftermath of a nuclear explosion. The horrors can be difficult to bear witness to, but Sachiko’s story, as well as her resilient spirit, warrant remembering. With ample reason to turn to anger and hate, Sachiko instead chooses to devote her life to cultivating peace. Told in spare but elegant prose, this award-winning narrative is geared toward young adults but makes for an engrossing read for older audiences too.

 
Great Risk Shift by Jacob HackerReviewed by Rabin Frame
Library Aide, Central Library
San Diego Union-Tribune, April 29, 2018
 
Medi-Cal, Medicare, unemployment and health insurances, Social Security: Why were these social safety nets created? How well do they serve us? Do they cost the nation or actually expand economic opportunity for all? Would pushing away from these safety nets invigorate or destroy our national ideals of shared fate and justice for all? The author, a professor of political science, clarifies the pressing economic issues of the day and the risks they impose. Reporting real-life examples at all economic levels, Hacker suggests solutions and provides thought-provoking information.

 
Kill All Normies by Angela Nagel book coverReviewed by Trevor Jones
Branch Manager, Scripps Miramar Ranch Library
San Diego Union-Tribune, April 15, 2018
 
Angela Nagle’s “Kill All Normies” is not for the faint of heart, queasy stomach or the righteously self-censorious. Nagle maps an eerie and awful genealogy of growing online vitriol, sarcasm and hate from the late 2000s to the recent 2016 election, from days of innocent meme-posting to the crazed days of the 2016 election when Hillary Clinton delivered her famous speech about the “alt-right” phenomenon. The serious import from the book, however, cannot be understated and unfortunately might be too casually dismissed by those not privy to Internet forums, Twitter, Facebook and other social media platforms. The cultural and political battle lines of the 21st century are being radically redrawn, and few understand what is at stake.

 
Strange the Dreamer by Laini TaylorReviewed by Melissa Giffen
Youth Services Librarian, San Ysidro Branch Library
San Diego Union-Tribune, April 1, 2018
 
“Strange the Dreamer” is a beautiful young-adult fantasy for mature readers that charms and devastates. The titular character, Lazlo Strange, is a librarian caught up in the pursuit of any knowledge of a mysterious lost city believed to be the stuff of mythology. Lazlo is convinced that the city is real and determined in his pursuit to find it and discover answers as to why it disappeared and no one remembers its true name. Lazlo makes an interesting and compelling protagonist in a tale full of the strange (pun intended) and heartbreaking.

 
Allegedlly by Tiffany JacksonReviewed by Bobbie Xuereb
Librarian II, Kensington-Normal Heights Library
San Diego Union-Tribune, March 18, 2018
 
An inside view of juvenile justice and “baby jail:” the place Mary B. Addison was sent for allegedly killing a baby that her mother was babysitting, before she was transferred to the group home where she now lives. Mary narrates her story, and we learn about what is happening at her group home, with glimpses into how she got here. Is she a reliable narrator? Will she ever be free of the shadow of what allegedly happened when she was 9 years old? This story is tense and tender. A youngadult book that will leave the reader with many questions.

 
The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny ColganReviewed by Julie K. Wong
Library Assistant, Carmel Valley Branch Library
San Diego Union-Tribune, March 4, 2018
 
A charming novel with Nina, a librarian, who purchases a van to open a traveling bookstore, in which she goes each day to sell books at food markets in the countryside of Scotland. Her friend, Surinder, encourages Nina to pursue romance as if she was looking to find a good book for her customers. Nina is the bookmatcher for her customers as she tries to find the best book that would fit their interests. Nina finds it easier to suggest books for customers than matching up herself for the prospect of romance. Nina provides kindness to everyone she meets. Now it is Nina’s turn to look for love beyond books.

 
 The Age of Cryptocurrency: How Bitcoin and Digital Money are Challenging the Global Economic Order by Paul Vigna and Michael J. CaseyReviewed by Virginia C. Hire Damrauer
Information Systems Technician, San Diego Central Library
San Diego Union-Tribune, Feb. 18, 2018
 
With themes of trust, freedom and privacy, the authors share stories from people in the digital money community. Within these pages, you will meet technology innovators who hope to change the world, entrepreneurs, employees who are paid only in digital money, miners, firm doubters and true believers. Within and around these real-life examples, the authors illuminate the benefits and drawbacks of modern efforts to provide a worldwide form of digital money.

 
When Breath Becomes Air by Paul KalanithiReviewed by Alice Yao
Librarian II, San Diego Central Library
San Diego Union-Tribune, Feb. 4, 2018
 
How does breath become air? Paul, a neurosurgeon, answers with his personal and medical point of view. He didn’t believe that anything, especially health, could go wrong since he was at the height of his career, but everything was threatened by a devastating diagnosis. With poignant perspectives, this story can move your heart.
 

 
The Word Exchange: A Novel by Alena GraedonReviewed by Phil Gunderson
Integrated Library System Coordinator, San Diego Central Library
San Diego Union-Tribune, Jan. 21, 2018
 
Graedon envisions a near-future dystopia in which people have become so dependent on personal digital devices (called Memes) that they pay to use an online “word exchange” to access the meanings of even common words. This is great for Synchronic, the corporation that owns the Word Exchange and has a near-monopoly on the English dictionary. The last holdout is the North American Dictionary of the English Language, whose chief lexicographer Douglas Johnson has gone missing. As Douglas’ daughter Anana begins investigating his disappearance, the social fabric starts to unravel as “word flu,” a highly contagious virus capable of leaping from Meme to brain, spreads through the population, causing aphasia in its victims and sometimes even death. The clues to both her father’s disappearance and the rise of word flu point in the same direction: Synchronic. A thrilling extrapolation from Socrates’ original misgivings about writing’s effects on memory.

 
Book cover for "The Boy Who Loved Too Much:  A True Story of Pathological Friendliness” by Jennifer Latson Reviewed by Kristina Garcia
Librarian II, San Diego Central Library
San Diego Union-Tribune, Jan. 7, 2018
 
Jennifer Latson, a journalist, spent three years with Gayle and Eli D'Angelo in order to accurately tell their story of living with the effects of the genetic disorder Williams Syndrome. Williams Syndrome affects learning, socialization, and physical development in very specific ways, but is not as well-known as other disorders such as autism. This highly informative yet readable book sharply illustrates Eli's unmodulated love of others and how his gregarious personality is both a joy and a burden to his mother as she tries to guide him to a fulfilling, happy, and safe adulthood. This book provides an engaging narrative that weaves themes of medical science with social science and keeps you rooting for Gayle and Eli all the way.
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